Valentine's Day Celebration!

Fri. Feb. 12, 7pm
Join us for a special performance of "Love's Labors Lost and Loves Labors Won" with Storyteller Extraordinaire Simon Brooks while feasting on Chocolate! Simon is a performer not to be missed! And who can object to sitting at a pretty table, nibbling chocolate delights, while listening to fabulous entertainment! Bring a date, or just have you own date with the chocolate. Adults only, please.

Lego Club!

Wed. Afternoons at 4pm
Kids from 5 to 100 are invited to create wonderful new Lego projects every Wednesday afternoon at the Library. We will have snacks and a New Challenge every week. Bring your imaginations! Thank you to Cameron Ellnor for helping with this program!

1000 Books before Kindergarten

The single most important thing you can do to prepare your children to read is to read to them every day. Research proves that children need to hear 1000 books before they begin to learn to read independently. Reading to children will increase their vocabulary and their listening and narrative skills. Reading with children will also help to instill in them self-awareness, confidence and an understanding of their place in the world.

HOW CAN I READ 1000 BOOKS? It’s easy! One book a day for three years=1000
Three books a day for one year=1000
Ten books a week for two years=1000

WHAT COUNTS? Everything! Every book you read counts every time you read it! Books your child hears in Storytime count. Books that others read to your child count. It all counts!

WHERE CAN I SIGN UP? Sign up at the Library. We will give you sheets to help you keep count of the first 100 books. When you finish reading 100 books, come back to the library for another set of sheets and a prize (We have beautiful book bags with this deer on them). We will celebrate all who finish reading 1000 books with a special event.

WHEN: Today! Register anytime when your child is between birth and five years old.

It’s one of the best gifts you will ever give your child…and yourself!

NH Bar Association’s Lawyer Referral Service

Newly available, this free service can help you decide if you need a lawyer, and if so, help find you one. More information .

Kids' Book Groups at the Library

How does it work?
Come in any time before the book group meeting date, pick up a copy of this month's book, read it, and then come to the meeting for snacks, discussion, games or crafts.

Who is it for?
We have two books for two groups. Children can choose the book they would rather read. We try to choose shorter books to keep it fun!

When is it?
Second Tuesday of the month (Feb. 9)for a slightly more challenging book, fourth Tuesday (Feb. 23) for an easier one. The time for both is 4:00. Children can come to the Library directly from school on the bus. The program lasts about 1 hour.

Books are available FREE at the Library. Come in and pick one up TODAY, so you can start reading!
February's Choices.


The Fourteenth Goldfish by Jennifer Holm. Meets Feb. 9
Stink by Megan McDonald. Meets Feb. 23.

Saturday Coffee Hour

Starts Feb. 7, 10-11am Join your friends and neighbors for a good cup of coffee, goodies, and all of the news!

Mission Statement

The Fitzwilliam Town Library supports the needs and interests of our community by offering information, experiences and ideas in creative ways.

Adopted by the Board of Trustees on March 3, 2014

Weather advisory- If the schools are closed, it is the Library's policy to close as well.

Fitzwilliam Film (and Food) Fest "The Crazy Stranger" France / Romania, 1998)

Friday, Feb. 19 at 7:00

In this comedy-drama, Stephane (Romain Duris), a young man from France, travels to Romania on a mission; his father has recently passed away, and since the old man's favorite singer was an unrecorded gypsy vocalist from Romania, he has come to track her down and put her music on tape. However, he's not sure where she is, and as he wanders though a village in battered shoes on a cold night, an older gentleman of gypsy blood, Izidor (Isidor Serban) allows him to spend the night in his home after regaling him with drunken rants about his dire fate. While gypsies take a dim view of strangers, Stephane goes out of his way to ingratiate himself into their community, and as the locals develop a grudging trust for him, Stephane meets Sabina (Rona Hartner), a beautiful gypsy dancer whose allure is matched by her fiery personality and blunt vocabulary. Izador is Sabina's accompanying musician, and as Stephane is drawn into Sabina's web by the passion of both her dancing and her lovemaking, he also becomes friends with the older man and struggles to better understand his way of life. Director Tony Gatlif, himself of gypsy heritage, previously directed a documentary about gypsy musicians, Latcho Drom. Romanian Refreshments!

Book Party: "Everything I Never Told You" by Celeste Ng

For Adults (Book Party on Mon. Feb. 8, 7pm)
Books available at the Library. A teenage girl goes missing and is later found to have drowned in a nearby lake, and suddenly a once tight-knit family unravels in unexpected ways. As the daughter of a college professor and his stay-at-home wife in a small Ohio town in the 1970s, Lydia Lee is already unwittingly part of the greater societal changes going on all around her. But Lydia suffers from pressure that has nothing to do with tuning out and turning on. Her father is an American born of first-generation Chinese immigrants, and his ethnicity, and hers, make them conspicuous in any setting. Her mother is white, and their interracial marriage raises eyebrows and some intrusive charges of miscegenation. More troubling, however, is her mother’s frustration at having given up medical school for motherhood, and how she blindly and selfishly insists that Lydia follow her road not taken. The cracks in Lydia’s perfect-daughter foundation grow slowly but erupt suddenly and tragically, and her death threatens to destroy her parents and deeply scar her siblings. Tantalizingly thrilling, Ng’s emotionally complex debut novel captures the tension between cultures and generations with the deft touch of a seasoned writer. Ng will be one to watch..

For Adults (Book Party on Mon. March 14, 7pm)
Books available at the Library. From the bestselling author and master of narrative nonfiction comes the enthralling story of the sinking of the Lusitania

On May 1, 1915, with WWI entering its tenth month, a luxury ocean liner as richly appointed as an English country house sailed out of New York, bound for Liverpool, carrying a record number of children and infants. The passengers were surprisingly at ease, even though Germany had declared the seas around Britain to be a war zone. For months, German U-boats had brought terror to the North Atlantic. But the Lusitania was one of the era’s great transatlantic “Greyhounds”—the fastest liner then in service—and her captain, William Thomas Turner, placed tremendous faith in the gentlemanly strictures of warfare that for a century had kept civilian ships safe from attack.

Germany, however, was determined to change the rules of the game, and Walther Schwieger, the captain of Unterseeboot-20, was happy to oblige. Meanwhile, an ultra-secret British intelligence unit tracked Schwieger’s U-boat, but told no one. As U-20 and the Lusitania made their way toward Liverpool, an array of forces both grand and achingly small—hubris, a chance fog, a closely guarded secret, and more—all converged to produce one of the great disasters of history.

It is a story that many of us think we know but don’t, and Erik Larson tells it thrillingly, switching between hunter and hunted while painting a larger portrait of America at the height of the Progressive Era. Full of glamour and suspense, Dead Wake brings to life a cast of evocative characters, from famed Boston bookseller Charles Lauriat to pioneering female architect Theodate Pope to President Woodrow Wilson, a man lost to grief, dreading the widening war but also captivated by the prospect of new love.

Gripping and important, Dead Wake captures the sheer drama and emotional power of a disaster whose intimate details and true meaning have long been obscured by history. Read the NYTimes review here.

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